Sheng Siong CEO’s mother kidnapped for ransom

From ‘Woman, 79, who was kidnapped, is mother of Sheng Siong CEO’, 9 Jan 2013, article by Walter Sim, ST

A 79-year-old woman who was kidnapped on Wednesday is the mother of Sheng Siong supermarket chief executive Lim Hock Chee. Mr Lim made it to the Forbes Singapore’s 50 Richest list last year and was listed at number 35 with a net worth of $515 million.

The elderly woman was said to have been kidnapped while she was walking near a bus-stop at Block 631, Hougang Avenue 8 on Wednesday. The police arrested two men in connection with the case on Thursday, after her son lodged a report. The woman was not hurt when she was snatched by the two suspects, and was later released at Seletar West Camp after a $2 million ransom was paid.

…The younger of the two suspects is an odd-job labourer, while the older man is a credit card promoter. Both suspects are Singaporeans and are not related. The police said that there have been only three confirmed cases of kidnapping for ransom in the last 10 years, and all perpetrators were arrested and later jailed for life. The $2 million is the highest amount paid in ransom in a kidnapping case here.

Kidnapping carries the death penalty or life imprisonment, a deceptively serious felony that can be potentially non-violent and even played for laughs in the movies if you’re the bungling kind, like the goofball villains in ‘Baby’s Day Out’. If you ever steal someone’s baby for ransom in Singapore, you may be charged and hanged, even if the kid got the better of you in the end.

Our Police nabbed the culprits within 12 hours, which suggests that the duo’s escape plan wasn’t well thought out. Liam Neeson from the Taken series would have nothing to worry about if he ever brought his loved ones here for vacation. For a penalty so severe, you would expect some sophistication and guile in the way kidnappers conduct their business, like a chartered getaway helicopter or elaborate decoy set ups. No such luck. They probably used Home Alone as a guide to how to abduct people.

Here’s a quick rundown of rich people targetted in our history of kidnapping and how much ransom they’re worth at the time. This Sheng Siong incident probably breaks the record for highest ransom ever demanded, and also the most dollar notes to ever to occupy a suitcase.

2014: Lim Hock Chee, Sheng Siong CEO (mother kidnapped): $2 million paid from initial $20 million.

2002: Tay Teng Joo, director of SUTL companies: $4 million negotiated down to $1.22 million. He was ambushed a day before his wedding. After he was released and the perpetrators caught, he went ahead with the wedding anyway.

1970: Millionaire, bank director, owner of fridge making company Tan Han Seng: $800,000.

1964: Shaw Vee Ming, Shaw managing director and son of the late Run Run Shaw: $500,000. Brother Harold escaped from an kidnap attempt in 1971.

1964: Millionaire Dato Ng Quee Lam: $420,000

1960: CK Tang: $150,000

1973: Tjioe Kow Hwie, Indonesian businessman: $50,000. The gang of 5 responsible for the abduction were sentenced to hang, the first few to be executed for the crime.

1964: Ng Choon Huat, son of a cloth merchant: $44,000. Ransom was ‘drastically’ slashed to $400.

It’s likely that the Sheng Siong kidnappers will get life imprisonment rather than death considering the victim emerged unharmed from the ordeal. The way in which the Police swung into action to rein in crooks who had the audacity to threaten the Sheng Siong empire is probably assuring for the 27 billionaires (and counting) attentively following this case and suddenly texting their children to check if they’re OK and not lured away by some evil PRCs.

Still, a Little India riot and a high profile kidnapping both within a month of each other in tiny Singapore. Exciting times.

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